To the Speaker of the House of Representatives

"Be Prepared" is more than a motto for the Boy Scouts of America. It is a way of life for our members and a way of conducting business for our movement.

The Boy Scouts of America was prepared to celebrate many successes in 2001. The organization was likewise prepared to respond to the challenges of 2001.

In May 2001, a new strategic plan was unveiled. It is designed to help ensure the continued success of Scouting. Developed with the guidance of our volunteer leadership, the 2002-2005 Strategic Plan focuses on five critical areas: traditional membership and unit growth, our Scoutreach program for hard-to-reach youth, leadership, marketing and strategic positioning, and financial development.

Cub Scouting celebrated an outstanding year with over 2 million registered members at year-end. With increased opportunities for outdoor program, 43 percent of the Cub Scout membership enjoyed a day camp, resident camp, or family camp experience.

The Boy Scouting program celebrated its highest percentage ever in long-term camping expeditions, with 60.9 percent of Boy Scouts and Varsity Scouts participating in outdoor educational adventures.

The Venturing program celebrated a membership increase of 18.2 percent. This character-building program for young men and women has enjoyed continuous growth since its introduction in 1998.

Last July, more than 40,000 Scouts and leaders came together at Fort A. P. Hill, Virginia, to celebrate the 15th National Scout Jamboree. It was the largest single-site jamboree in 37 years. For 10 days, Scouts from across the country and from around the world participated in the fun, adventure, and brotherhood Scouting offers.


Milton H. Ward
President


Roy L. Williams
Chief Scout Executive

Scouts and Scouters faced up to emergencies during 2001, demonstrating the values and skills of Scouting. The National Court of Honor awarded the Honor Medal With Crossed Palms to eight Scouts and Scouters who demonstrated unusual heroism and extraordinary skill or resourcefulness in saving or attempting to save a life at extreme risk to self. In addition, 289 Scouts and Scouters received national recognition for lifesaving and meritorious action.

The Eagle Scout rank was awarded to 43,665 young men.

As the organization prepared for another exciting and promising new Scouting year, September 11 changed everyone's priorities. When the tragic events of that day happened, the bond of the Scout Oath drew together Scouts and leaders across the United States to "do my best to do my duty" and "help other people at all times."

Scouts in communities across the country quickly mobilized to collect food and other necessities for the victims, their families, and rescue workers. They rallied the patriotism of a country in need.

In the hours following the attacks, the services performed by Scouts in action are countless. In Idaho Falls, Scouts placed flags in the front yards of one out of three families. The Rochester, New York, council offered its service center to the Red Cross as a community blood donation center. Scouts in the South Florida Council held a community candlelight vigil less than 72 hours after the attack. In Atlanta and Detroit, Scouts handed out hundreds of car flags. Scouts in Medford, New York, collected over 150,000 bottles of water and energy drinks for Ground Zero workers. An assistant Scoutmaster and Air Force major was one of the very first to respond to a call for volunteers to enter the Pentagon building to seek and offer aid to the hundreds of trapped victims.

The acts of service continue today. All Scouts were called upon by President Bush to help the children of Afghanistan by supporting the Afghan Children's Fund. Scouts were quick to respond. Every fire station, police precinct, and emergency service facility in New York City was personally recognized by the local Cub Scout and Boy Scout units with a special commendation for bravery and heroism.

The celebrations and the challenges of the past year provided proof that Scouting is vital and prepared for the dynamic needs of its membership and the country. Because of strategic planning, keen leadership, and the commitment and support of chartered organizations and 1.3 million volunteers, the enduring values of the Scout Oath and Law are stronger today than ever.

Milton H. Ward Roy L. Williams

Milton H. Ward
President

Roy L. Williams
Chief Scout Executive